Jovica Stanisic and Franko Simatovic. Photo: balkaninsight.com via Bing.
Jovica Stanisic and Franko Simatovic. Photo: balkaninsight.com via Bing.

MICT TC denies Prosecution app to admit new written statement in Stanisic and Simatovic retrial: The MICT Trial Chamber (TC) found that the Prosecution proposed evidence does not satisfy the requirements of its Decision for admission of new evidence dated 2 February 2017 . Hence, the TC denied the Prosecution motion filed on 24 May 2017 to admit new written statement in Stanisic and Simatovic retrial. According to the Prosecution, the proposed evidence satisfy the requirements of the Rules of Procedure and Evidence since i) it was not initially available, ii) it could not have been discovered before. In addition, the Prosecution argues that the admission of the proposed evidence would iii) advance the proceedings and iv) be in the interest of justice. Both accused opposed the request stating that the proposed evidence « does not fall within the limited circumstances identified in the TC decisions where new evidence may be admitted ». On 2 February 2017, the TC limited « the Prosecution’s evidence to that presented during the original trial » and allowed to present new evidence « only in certain limited circumstances ». While the Prosecution considered that such a decision jeopardized the fairness of the proceedings, the TC considers that limiting the Prosecution’s evidence falls into its own discretion and is motivated by the importance of not prolonging the retrial proceedings to safeguard the rights of the Accused. The TC considers that the requested witness is new and not ‘critical’ since his allegations are « well-supported by evidence from the original trial ». It further considers that the Prosecution failed to demonstrate that the witness’s evidence could not have been discovered during the initial trial. (MICT)

 

ICC launches project to increase reviewability of Ongwen trial in Uganda : On 17 July 2017, the ICC Registrar and the Danish Ambassador to Uganda launched an “Access to Justice” project in Kampala with the aim to facilitate the ICC’s efforts « to respond to the information demands of the communities affected by the conflict in northern Uganda » and to enhance both the capacity and the engagement of locals to follow the current proceedings against Dominic Ongwen at the ICC. According to Mr von Hebel, its purpose is to transform the vast local interests « into popular participation and ownership of the processes, and to strengthen local confidence in the Court’s work and in justice and accountability in general ». Funded by the Danish International Development Agency, the project will provide « video screening equipment at  23 locations where Dominic Ongwen is alleged to have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity ». (ICC website ;

New Vision)