Srebrenica_massacre_memorial_gravestones_2009_1Dutch court finds Dutch Government partially responsible for 350 deaths at Srebrenica: A Dutch appeals court largely upheld a 2014 domestic ruling finding the Netherlands (NL) responsible for the deaths of 350 Bosnian Muslim men in the Srebrenica massacre as Dutch peacekeepers (the Dutchbat) handed them over to the Bosnian Serb army in July 1995 while knowing the dangers they faced. Judge Gepke Dulek said “Dutchbat knew that the men ran a real risk of inhumane treatment or execution” but considered that NL should only be responsible for 30% of damages, as there was “a 70% likelihood the male refugees would have been dragged from the safety of the base whatever the peacekeepers had done” and “would have been killed regardless”. While exact numbers are unknown, ICRC and ICTY say that it stands between 7,000 and 8,000 of Bosniaks murdered at Srebrenica. The July 1995 massacre of more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys was considered Europe’s worst since World War Two (BBC ; Telegraph)

 

Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. Photo: ECCC via Flickr (CC).
Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. Photo: ECCC via Flickr (CC).

ECCC closes investigation of Yim Tith: On 27 June 2017, after eight years of investigation, the co-investigative judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) announced the conclusion of their investigation into Yim Tith’s alleged involvement with the Democratic Kampuchea regime. Yim Tith was alleged to have held a “mid-rank position in the regime and was accused of crimes against humanity including the persecution of Khmer Krom and Vietnamese people”. Parties have 15 days to launch complaints over the decision and request further investigation. Yim Tith was, along with other high-profile of the Khmer Rouge regime such as Ao An and Im Chaem, a suspect in case 004. Last February, the investigative judges considered that Im Chaem’s case was not “within the court’s jurisdiction as she was not considered a senior Khmer Rouge regime official”. Regretting the closing of these cases after such a long investigation, a court observer and a human rights worker from Cambodia denounced that these decisions were caused by a lack of funding and political will and increasement of political pressure, considering that parties would not get justice at the ECCC “so long as the problems persisted”. (VOA Cambodia)