Rodrigo Duterte. Photo: getrealphilippines.com via Bing (CC).
Rodrigo Duterte. Photo: getrealphilippines.com via Bing (CC).

Amnesty calls on ICC to investigate alleged CAHs in Phillipines: On 4 December, Amnesty International (AI) issued a statement calling for the ICC to urgently open a preliminary examination into alleged crimes against humanity committed in the context of the ‘war on drugs’ in the Philippines. Amnesty’s call comes amid growing reports of crimes against humanity allegedly being committed against children in anti-drug operations in the country. “It is time for international justice mechanisms to step in and end the carnage on Philippine streets by bringing the perpetrators to justice. The country’s judiciary and police have proven themselves both unwilling and unable to hold the killers in the ‘war on drugs’ to account,” said James Gomez, AI’ Regional Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific. In the statement, AI points the finger to President Duterte and other high-level government officials, alleging their involvement in commanding the killings. “The ICC must act now. We believe the “war on drugs” meets the threshold of crimes against humanity under the Rome Statute, and international pressure is needed to persuade the Philippine authorities to change course,” concluded Gomez. (Amnesty International)

Two convicted of CAH in Argentinian courts for 1976-83 murders and torture: On 29 November, two former navy officers in Argentina were sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes against humanity committed between 1976 and 1983 under military rule. The two defendants in question, captains Alfredo Astiz and Jorge Eduardo Acosta, were found guilty of involvement in the torture and murder of hundreds of political opponents during the ruling decade of the military junta. They were among the 54 people who were tried for alleged crimes committed at the Naval Mechanical School, or Esma, a widely-known Buenos Aires navy school that was used as a clandestine torture centre during those years. The trial initially opened in 2012, focusing on crimes committed at Esma against 789 victims. Both Astiz and Acosta had also been sentenced to life in prison in 2011 for other counts of torture, murder and forced disappearance.(BBC)